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Tag: Preservation

Spectacular Copy Turbo to Disk, SCT2D, has become a widely used tool for preserving turbo tapes. It was originally part of the “Spectacular Copy” suite by Stephan Senz. “Turbo to disk” was extracted and has undergone many improvements on the way.

Latest addon to the tool is a Fast I/O save routine for 1541-family drives.

You can find the tool at CSDB, http://csdb.dk/release/?id=144377

 
SDT2D Changelog:

v1.2 by SAILOR of TRIAD
* Fastsave I/O for 1541 drives.

v1.1 by WACKEE of ARISE:
* Automatic replacing of invalid chars (,*?) before save [option].
* Accurate block size calculation.
* Proper handling of 0-byte files.
* Fixed resave on diskerror.
* Rename without space-fill.
* Tapeload with sound.
* Changed default settings.

v1.0 by SAILOR of TRIAD:
* Asks for disk change if file is larger than free blocks on disk.
* Resave option on diskerror.
* Option to rename file.
* Can use other devices than #8.
* Autotransfer mode option.
* Load error detection.

 

 


Xiny6581 has made a speed comparsion between SCT2D v1.1 and v1.2. Make sure to read his excellent tutorial on preserving tapes at http://sidpreservation.6581.org/how-to-preserve-tapes/.
 

 

d2d64_3

I needed a program to transfer C64 disks to .d64 images with a good overview of the process, but more importantly, it had to be fast and with minimial interaction to be used for reading disks in large batches. I ended up making a modified version of Nibread which i decided to call d2d64 so it would not be mixed up with the original Nibread. Nibread is part of the Nibtools utilities by Pete Rittwage at the C64 Preservation Project (http://c64preservation.com/).

d2d64 should not be used for preserving originals, it is only for making backups of your unprotected disks.

 
d2d64 has a new UI with a progressbar and colors to indicate status. It saves the disk as a .d64, defaults to 35 tracks, uses errorinfo if appliciable and will not reset/bump between reads. It also has an option for creating filenames based on the A/B-side of a disk. All you need to do is press Enter between the disksides.
 


I made a video on youtube that shows the process of transferring a disk. The whole video is 41 seconds, including initializing drive, turning disk and reading two disksides. Reading one diskside takes about 15-18 seconds. Hardware is a 1571 with serial cable (-s: SRQ) and a Zoomfloppy. OS is Windows 10.

 

There are two versions of d2d64 available. First one is based on nibtools (with SRQ support) for xum1541/Zoomfloppy users. This is probably the one you want. The second one is an older version based on mnib(predecessor to nibtools) and should be used with XMP/XAP1541 cables(LPT-connected drives). You can scroll down to the “Short history” part of this post for a brief explanation on the hardware differences. The older version I made between 2007-2010 when Zoomfloppy was not available. I decided to include it here in case some of you (like me) still have their XA/XM1541 systems running.
 

Download:


 

If you want to preserve your originals, visit these links below:
Kryoflux: http://www.kryoflux.com/
nibtools: http://c64preservation.com/nibtools

 

Short history
The Commodore drives communicate with serial communication through a DIN-6 plug cable between the drive and computer. For faster speeds, a parallel cable evolved allowing 8-bits to travel in parallel. The drive parallelcable was not a previous standard, but a cable soldered directly to the second VIA-chip on the drive and then connected to the C64 Userport.
 

The 15×1 drives don’t have a standard communication port and therefor you need a special cable to hook the drive to a PC. Early software even transferred files and images through the V.24/RS232-serial protocol.
 

Later on(1992-) came the X1541-cables which provided multiple options to connect your drive to the PC. The drive was connected to the PC through the LPT-parallelport which required exact timing to work. There were incompatibilities with some motherboards which were circumvented by different versions of the 1541-cable. The drive parallelcable was also available for the X1541 cables and added a “P” to the name.

Even later came OpenCBM, based on CBM4Linux, making it possible to communicate with drives under Windows NT/2K/XP with XA/XM1541 cables.

You can read everything about the X1541-cables at Joe Forsters homepage: here
 


My x1541 breakout box from the early days. This connected to the LPT-parallelport on a PC and disk transfering was done in DOS. Old PC-hardware did not work properly with all x1541-cables so i needed a device for testing combinations and different low level components.
 


XMP1541 in the making…
 

USB to the rescue
The LPT-Parallelport became more and more obsolete when the PC hardware evolved. Lots of tinkering with timings and settings was also required to get it working.
 
Till Harbaum worked on an USB adapter called xu1541 until he lost interest in 2007. Nate Lawson, with Wolfgang Moser and Spiro Trikaliotis, continued the project and developed it even further. In early 2009 the xum1541(pronounced “zoom”) was introduced, a full speed USB device with support for parallel transfers. Best known xum1541 implementation is the Zoomfloppy. Today OpenCBM also supports the xum1541.

 
Read more on the following links:
xum1541: http://www.root.org/~nate/c64/xum1541/
Zoomfloppy: http://www.go4retro.com/products/zoomfloppy/